If you’ve watched many of my videos you’ll have seen at least one where I talk about values and how important they are for you and your company. You also may have heard me talk about what I call clarifying statements. These are the statements that explain what your value terms mean to you.

Often people like you will ask me what I mean by clarifying statements. That’s what today’s video is all about. I want you to understand how to build clarifying statements around your values. I’m even going to show you a few ways you can use them in your business and your life.

Transcript

If you’ve watched many of my videos you’ll have seen at least one where I talk about values, and how important they are for you and your company. You also may have heard me talk about what I call clarifying statements. These are the statements that explain what your values mean to you so others know what you’re talking about.

Often I’m asked what I mean by clarifying statements. Well, that’s what today’s video is all about. I want you to understand how to build clarifying statements around your values, and I’m even gonna show you a few ways you can use them in your business and in your life.

So, let’s jump right in.

  1. First, let’s figure out what a clarifying statement is. A clarifying statement is a sentence or two that describes what your value means.
  2. One of my core values in my world is a personal responsibility. And personal responsibility for me means I am personally responsible for what happens to my life, I don’t blame and I don’t justify other people. And if I’m going to be personally responsible what do I need to be doing? Well, if I look to this system and not the person that’s probably right. If I don’t blame people when something happens, I look for why it might happen and what did we learn from it, then I’m being personally responsible. But if I blame somebody when something goes wrong it’s really hard for me to be personally responsible.
  3. So, when you build a clarifying statement around a value what you want to be making sure that you do is that you want to make sure that when you build that clarifying statement it’s really true for what you mean and what you want. You don’t want to craft only one or two sentences, so let me give you an example. Simplification, simplification is one of our values. Simplification, the way we describe it is we make the complicated, and we make it simple.
  4. And well, why is this important? Well, now you know what I mean when I give you the definition about what simplification is. Unless I provided you with that definition you could actually make a big mistake.
  5. So, let’s show ya something about how this could possibly go really wrong. Let’s take the value rights and respect. So, my definition of rights and respect is respect you as a person, and expect you to respect us also. Well, somebody else might say you stand for political justice, and your purpose is to work hard for the underdog to right the wrongs made against them. Well, that’s a perfectly good definition for rights and respect. It may not be your definition. My definition is we respect you as a person and expect you to respect us at the same time, so it’s a very, very different thing. So, it’s really, really important that when you’re doing a clarifying statement around your values it’s what’s true for you, and you use that clarifying statement when you say the value. If I say rights and respect is a value I have, I have to give you the definition for what that means when I say it. Why do I do that? I want you to understand what I’m talking about. And the problem is is that even though English has 50, or 60, or 70,000 words in it it’s still not exact. We can’t just say one word and everybody knows what we mean. We can say that one word and we know what it means, but the chances are better that you have no idea what I’m talking about unless I give you a clarifying statement.
  6. So, here’s the thing that I want you to think about. I want you to use a clarifying statement when you’re hiring. It tells you about what’s going on, and why somebody would want to come to work with you. Last time we hired somebody for our office, instead of doing the laundry list of what the job was I wrote a very short paragraph about what the success factors were for the job. I then went on to write four or five paragraphs about each of our values. One paragraph on each value, what it meant, why it was important, and why the person who was coming to work with us would have to exhibit this. So, when we hired our last assistant, who by the way is just super, Jess is great. And when we hired her, the reason she wanted to work with us wasn’t because of what the job description was, it wasn’t because of what those success factors for the job was, it was about our values and whether the values fit in with what her belief system was also. When you’re out there and you’re putting your values and your clarifying statements out for the world to see, you’re finding, and other people are finding, whether you’re the right tribe for them to join, whether you’re the right business for them to join. By using the clarifying statements around values you have a really easy way of evaluating whether someone still belongs in your company, whether they’re the right person for your company, not necessarily the right seat, but are they the right person that should be in your company. You get to evaluate whether a vendor is the type of person you want to work with. How do they work with your values, do the clarifying statements you have fit in with how they interact with you? Because that’s just as important as how you interact and others. And your values and your clarifying statements, they tell your customers what you’re about, they tell your customers whether you’re the right place to go or not. And frankly, you don’t want to be the right place to go for everybody who could possibly buy what you have. That way you’re spending, you get the wrong customer in when that happens, and you spend way too much time trying to make that customer happy because they don’t have the same belief system or they don’t appreciate the same belief system that you have.

So, those are three really good ways to use values in your company, and using clarifying statements around them. So, here’s what I want you to do. I want you to make sure that you build a value, you put clarifying statements around there, and it’s gonna help you to have a business that you love to own, and eventually someone else might want to own, but it’s a major step in what we call creating the sale-ready company.

So, what do you think? Are you ready to put in some effort in putting together clarifying statements for your company? Why don’t you scroll down and let me know what you think about using clarifying statements in your company.

And while you’re at it DOWNLOAD our Free Cheat Sheet at how to discover your values and put together clarifying statements. Just click on the button below the video and it’ll be on its way to you.

Hey, this is Josh Patrick, you’re at The Sustainable Business. Thanks a lot for stopping by. I hope to see you back here really soon.

Topics: statements, Video, defining values, values, Sustainable Business, clarifying statements, Hiring, personal responsibility

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