All employers I know want their employees to take them seriously. This means they want their employees to believe what comes out of their mouths.

To have that happen you have to be seen as authentic in your company. Authenticity means you walk your talk. Not only do you talk a good game, but your actions back it up. The truth is your employees don’t really listen to what you say, they watch what you do.

 

Transcript

You know, all employers I know, want their employees to take them seriously. This means they want their employees to believe what comes out of their mouths.

You know, to have this happen, you have to be seen as authentic in your company. Authenticity means you walk your talk. Not only do you talk a good game, but your actions back it up. The truth is, your employees don't really listen to what you say, they watch what you do.

This was a huge problem I had in my early business career. I wasn't seen as authentic by my employees. In fact, my employees saw me as a giant fraud. The reason was simple, I would spout platitudes and then never back them up with my actions.

We get frustrated because we're not seen as authentic. We know something is wrong, we just don't know what it is and our employees never tell us.

So if you want to be believed, you must walk your talk. You must do what you say you're going to do. And if you don't, no one in your company will trust or believe you.

You know, I've done this wrong way too many times. I thought it mattered what I said. I never realized how much not being congruent with what I said hurt me and the company. So I wanna talk about personal responsibility for a second, 'cause that is my core value. And the journey that I took to get there was a pretty painful one.

You know, at first I was at the seminar and I realized how important personal responsibility was. And I went back, running to my company after it was over, and I started talking about personal responsibility all over the place. There was a problem with that. I wasn't being personally responsible myself. I was expecting everybody to be personally responsible, but here I was blaming others for when things went wrong or justifying my actions to try to explain my way out of it. Well, when I was saying that, none of the people in my company believed the word I said, because my actions did not back up my words. Now, over a period of a few years, I finally got it, that I can't just say it, I actually have to do it. And I started doing it. And I did it at a level that was pretty extreme for three or four years. Then finally people started taking me seriously, when I started talking about personal responsibility. And the company changed for the better. So much for the better, that I can't even really explain how much better it was. It was just, it was like going from zero to 95 in a period of a few years. The indifference in the company was amazing.

You know, I believe that personal responsibility is the key to any company moving forward. It doesn't have to be one of your core values, but if you don't take responsibility for what goes on in your company, how can you get others to take responsibility for what they do?

So if you wanna develop a culture of personal responsibility, it's pretty simple.

  1. Number one, decide that you wanna become personally responsible in your company, and for that matter, your life. Making that decision is the first step. Sometimes it's the hardest step to take, because we don't tell ourselves the truth. Which brings us to step number two.

  2. Take a hard look in the mirror and see if that's what you're actually doing. I know that when I started off and I said, I'm gonna be personal responsibility. It didn't happen. I took a look in the mirror and I saw myself as this great because I was saying that I must be doing it. And then finally, after six months or seven months or eight months of this, I said, you know this isn't working very well. Maybe you should take a harder look at yourself. And that's when I realized that I was blaming and justifying, even though I was talking a good game, I wasn't doing the good game.

  3. And number three, be honest with your stakeholders about where you really are. If you're working on it, let others know this is a work in progress. If you're just beginning, say that also. But if you're really, really doing it, you don't need to say anything about what you're doing 'cause people are gonna see that you're doing it. They're going to watch your actions you know, actions are gonna back up your words.

So if you follow these three simple rules, you'll find that people start taking you seriously. You can also use those methods for any value that's important to you in your business or for that matter, your life. Following these three steps allows you to be seen as authentic and more importantly, you'll be walking your talk and people will trust you.

You know, I would love to have a conversation with you about this, so feel free contacting me at jpatrick@stage2planning.com to set up a time for us to talk.

You know, in the meantime, if you're not ready to talk, download our free eBook on Relationships And Roles in your business. You might find that you should be spending your time in a completely different way in how you're living your life now.

And while you're at it, scroll down and let me know what you think about holding on to the wisdom you have and the relationships you have.

Hey, this is Josh Patrick. You're at the sustainable business. Thanks a lot for stopping by, I hope to see you back here really soon.

Topics: Sustainable Business, personal responsibility, origin story, building a great business

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